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top breed newfoundland indiana

Welcome to Horner Newfoundlands. Where we provide AKC standard Newfoundland puppies Indiana and surrounding states.

In 1998, I made the decision-to-purchase my first purebred dog. After much thought and reviewing a lot of dog breed books, I purchased a Newfoundland for my wife’s birthday. It was simply the best decision we’ve made.

We reside on 21 acres in rural Wilmington Ohio where our dogs have the much-appreciated room to play, eat, sleep and have beautiful puppies.

Our dogs live with us forever, and the pups are an added bonus. I strive to produce the perfect Newfoundland. I follow AKC standards to the best of my ability. The following colors are AKC standard; black, brown, gray and white with black markings.

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR PUPPIES CLICK HERE

Official Standard of the Newfoundland Dog

Source: AKC

General Appearance: The Newfoundland puppy is a sweet-dis-positioned dog that acts neither dull nor ill-tempered. She is a devoted companion. A multipurposed canine, at home, on land and in water, the Newfoundland breed is capable of draft work and possesses natural lifesaving abilities.

The Newfoundland dog is a large, heavily coated, well-balanced dog that is deep-bodied, heavily boned, muscular, and strong. A great specimen of the breed has dignity and proud head carriage. The following description is that of the ideal Newfoundland.

Any deviation from this ideal is to be penalized to the extent of the deviation. Structural and movement faults common to all working dogs are as undesirable in the Newfoundland as in any other breed, even though they are not specifically mentioned herein.

Size, Proportion, Substance: Average height for adult dogs is 28 inches, for adult bitches 26 inches. Approximate weight of adult dogs range from 130 to 150 pounds, adult bitches from 100 to 120 pounds. The dog’s appearance is more massive throughout than the bitch’s. Large size is desirable, but never at the expense of balance, structure, and correct gait. The Newfoundland is
slightly longer than tall when measured from the point of shoulder to point of buttocks and from withers to ground. He is a dog of considerable substance which is determined by spring of rib, strong muscle, and heavy bone.

Head: The head is massive, with a broad skull, slightly arched crown, and strongly developed occipital bone. Cheeks are well developed. Eyes are dark brown. (Browns and Grays may have lighter eyes and should be penalized only to the extent that color affects expression.) They are relatively small, deep-set, and spaced wide apart. Eyelids fit closely with no inversion. Ears are
relatively small and triangular with rounded tips. They are set on the skull level with, or slightly above, the brow and lie close to the head. When the ear is brought forward, it reaches to the inner corner of the eye on the same side. Expression is soft and reflects the characteristics of the breed: benevolence, intelligence, and dignity. Forehead and face are smooth and free of wrinkles.

Slope of the stop is moderate but, because of the well-developed brow, it may appear abrupt in profile. The muzzle is clean-cut, broad throughout its length, and deep. Depth and length are approximately equal, the length from tip of nose to stop being less than that from stop to occiput. The top of the muzzle is rounded, and the bridge, in profile, is straight or only slightly arched. Teeth meet in a scissors or level bite. Dropped lower incisors, in an otherwise normal bite, are not indicative of a skeletal malocclusion and should be considered only a minor deviation.

About Indiana

Indiana is a U.S. state located in the midwestern and Great Lakes regions of North America. Indiana is the 38th largest by area and the 16th most populous of the 50 United States. Its capital and largest city is Indianapolis. Indiana was admitted to the United States as the 19th U.S. state on December 11, 1816.

Before becoming a territory, varying cultures of indigenous peoples and historic Native Americans inhabited Indiana for thousands of years. Since its founding as a territory, settlement patterns in Indiana have reflected regional cultural segmentation present in the Eastern United States; the state’s northernmost tier was settled primarily by people from New England and New York, Central Indiana by migrants from the Mid-Atlantic states and from adjacent Ohio, and Southern Indiana by settlers from the Southern states, particularly Kentucky and Tennessee.[5]Indiana has a diverse economy with a gross state product of $298 billion in 2012.[6] Indiana has several metropolitan areas with populations greater than 100,000 and a number of smaller industrial cities and towns. Indiana is home to several major sports teams and athletic events including the NFL’s Indianapolis Colts, the NBA’s Indiana Pacers, the WNBA’s Indiana Fever, the Indianapolis 500, and Brickyard 400 motorsports races.

The first inhabitants in what is now Indiana were the Paleo-Indians, who arrived about 8000 BC after the melting of the glaciers at the end of the Ice Age. Divided into small groups, the Paleo-Indians were nomads who hunted large game such as mastodons. They created stone tools made out of chert by chipping, knapping and flaking.[13] The Archaic period, which began between 5000 and 4000 BC, covered the next phase of indigenous culture. The people developed new tools as well as techniques to cook food, an important step in civilization. Such new tools included different types of spear points and knives, with various forms of notches. They made ground-stone tools such as stone axes, woodworking tools and grinding stones. During the latter part of the period, they built earthwork mounds and middens, which showed that settlements were becoming more permanent.

The Archaic period ended at about 1500 BC, although some Archaic people lived until 700 BC.[13] Afterward, the Woodland period took place in Indiana, where various new cultural attributes appeared. During this period, the people created ceramics and pottery, and extended their cultivation of plants. An early Woodland period group named the Adena people had elegant burial rituals, featuring log tombs beneath earth mounds. In the middle portion of the Woodland period, the Hopewell people began developing long-range trade of goods. Nearing the end of the stage, the people developed highly productive cultivation and adaptation of agriculture, growing such crops as corn and squash. The Woodland period ended around 1000 AD.[13]The Mississippian culture emerged, lasting from 1000 until the 15th century, shortly before the arrival of Europeans. During this stage, the people created large urban settlements designed according to their cosmology, with large mounds and plazas defining ceremonial and public spaces. The concentrated settlements depended on the agricultural surpluses. One such complex was the Angel Mounds. They had large public areas such as plazas and platform mounds, where leaders lived or conducted rituals. Mississippian civilization collapsed in Indiana during the mid-15th century for reasons that remain unclear.[13]The historic Native American tribes in the area at the time of European encounter spoke different languages of the Algonquian family. They included the Shawnee, Miami, and Illini. Later they were joined by refugee tribes from eastern regions including the Delaware who settled in the White and Whitewater River Valleys.

source: Wikipedia

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